Pulse Perspectives and Hatched alumni’s art journey

Ben Bannan _Pulse and Hatched
Artist and Pulse Perspectives and Hatched alumni, Ben Bannan.

Ben Bannan knows a thing or two about how to carve a successful path in Western Australia’s arts industry having been selected as a Pulse Perspectives artist in 2014 and  Hatched 2018. We recently chatted to Ben about his inspirational art journey.

What do you remember about your experience in the Pulse Perspectives exhibition? Did you take away new ideas, advice that has helped you get to where you are now?

I remember being really excited that both of my year 12 works had been accepted into the exhibition. At that time Year 12 Perspectives seemed like the biggest possible opportunity and more than anything I was excited that my work could be viewed by such a large audience. I think being in the exhibition helped give me some confidence to study contemporary art at a tertiary level.

What influenced you to go down the artistic path and who would you say has had the most profound impact on your choices so far?

Art was always something I did for joy and comfort growing up. From doing art for leisure to pursuing a career in the arts there have been different people and mentors along the way that have impacted me. I had very supportive art teachers in high school who nurtured my enthusiasm and then when I went to University, I had lecturers that really encouraged me to take risks. Most recently in February, I finished an internship at PICA with Eugenio Viola and Charlotte Hickson. This was a particularly formative experience for me, and they are both people who have helped expand the way I think about my arts practice and other ways of engaging with the arts professionally.

What advice can you give the artists in Pulse Perspectives this year in relation to how to forge ahead with their artistic career? What are the challenges they may face?

I’d really encourage anyone wanting to forge a career in the arts to engage with artist-run-spaces in Perth such as Cool Change Contemporary, Paper Mountain and The Lobby to name a few. These are the spaces where peers are showing, making and supporting local and national art and supporting them gives artists the opportunity to really engage with and become part of the arts community. Pursuing a career in the arts can often be really frustrating when you often encounter people who might not understand your choices or dismiss the industry. I think these encounters are important in challenging your goals, but they also become a lot easier to answer and justify when you feel like you’re making the decision alongside a large number of really amazing, talented and driven people.

You exhibited in Hatched 2018. How does this experience different to what you went through with Perspectives?

I exhibited in Hatched 2018. Graduating from art school was very different from graduating from year 12. High school focuses on developing two singular works or ‘final pieces’ that are meant to encapsulate everything you know and have learnt up until that point. My experience in art school was much more about developing ways of working and interests that could develop into bodies of work and sustain a practice. Therefore, my Hatched experience included much more of focus on working with PICA to customize my project for the exhibition in a way that best fitted my work within the constraints of a large group show. It was really my first experience with gallery practices and protocols and it was exciting to be a part of that process.

Any exciting news/projects you would like to share with our subscribers?

I currently have some work in an exhibition called looking now anyone here with Brent Harrison and Wade Taylor at Paper Mountain, as well as a collaborative work with Penny Coss at Mundaring Arts Centre as part of their 40th-anniversary exhibition Continuity and Change: Future.

Pulse Perspectives exhibition is showing at AGWA until 22 July.

Following your visit to Pulse Perspectives, vote for your favourite piece of work in the Act-Belong-Commit People’s Choice Award. 

Top 10 things to experience at ART BALL Electric Dreams

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ART BALL – It’s not your usual black-tie gala. Find out why it’s touted as the event on Perth’s social calendar.

Final tickets are on sale now at artball.com.au

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NUMBER 1: 100% PERTH MUSIC LINE UP
Perth’s famous indie-pop-rockers San Cisco; multi-WA Music Award-winning synth duo FEELS and rising electro-pop stars Priscilla will ignite the main stage with epic live sets, while ART BALL 2019 resident DJ, ALSAN (Ash Keogh), will dominate the decks.

THE HUXLEYS

NUMBER 2: THE HUXLEYS
Iconic Australian performance art duo, The Huxleys, literally step right out of the pages of VOGUE and into ART BALL, roaming the corridors of the iconic AGWA building in their provocative, hyper-glam costumes, bringing their decorative absurdity to Perth for one night only.

NUMBER 3: BUBBLE POP BALL PIT
BALLS! A lot of them! A huge 15,000 litre ball pit will take over AGWA’s Imagination room, complete with stair to get in and out of it in your black-tie garb.

YUMMY

NUMBER 4: YUMMY and the TNT ALL STARS
Cult cabaret performance legends YUMMY return to Perth especially for ART BALL to take guests on the most delicious and unpredictable ride of their lives. The joy-evoking cast will deliver their signature high-camp style and world-class circus skills to killer pop-tracks. YUMMY hostess-with-the-mostess, Valerie Hex, will also MC the night. The final floorshow will be an unforgettable, high-octane collaboration between the YUMMY cast and Perth’s international cheer squad, the TNT All Stars.

NUMBER 5. ALL DRANKS ALL NIGHT!
Perth’s trendiest boutique hotel, QT Perth, will be serving delicious signature cocktails from the QT Bar. French Champagne house G.H. Mumm is bringing the quality bubbles, with Juniper Estate wines and WA craft beer pouring all night. That right folks, all dranks included in your ticket, all night!

NUMBER 6. THE SLUMBER SALON
Perth-born light artist Brendan Harwood will create a three-story interactive projection installation using motion sensing technology that triggers a cascade of neon orbs to fall down the wall and attach to the outline of the users body shape, creating a giant, neon avatar. The work will be enjoyed by the user as well as providing a spectacle for those enjoying the visual delights of the work as they sip champagne and cocktails in king-sized beds.

NUMBER 7. NUDE LIFE DRAWING
ART BALL’s infamous nude life drawing sessions return with a curious glow-in-the-dark twist.

NUMBER 8. FINE FEASTING
You won’t go hungry at this event. For the first time, ART BALL introduces the all new ELECTRIC EATERY, a lavish space where guests can retreat for some serious winter-warmer feasting. Think braised Harvey beef cheek on mash, buckets of sweet potato fries, a pimped up hot dog stand with premium WA snags, bowls of gooey mac’n’cheese and a self-serve sundae station where guests can go nuts with their own creations after visiting the hot chocolate and affogatto bar.

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NUMBER 9. GENDERMESS
Perth’s own costumed club-kid misfits Gendermess return to ART BALL to slay the stage with their alternative drag and unforgettable stage presence.

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NUMBER 10. THE FINALE
West Australian Opera star Soprano, Pia Harris, will close the night out with a spectacular rendition of Puccini’s famous aria, O Mio Babbino Caro at the stroke of midnight.

Final tickets are on sale now at artball.com.au

ART BALL RAFFLE 

WIN a trip to PARIS

Buy a ticket to this year’s ART BALL Raffle and you could WIN a Business Class trip to Paris courtesy of Singapore Airlines plus a once in a lifetime one day Maison Mumm experience for two people. If a Parisian trip is not your thing, there’s also a fantastic second and third prize up for grabs. 

Tickets are only $50 each. Proceeds from the ART BALL raffle support the Art Gallery of Western Australia Foundation, so make a difference and go in the draw to win some truly magnificent prizes!

Wirnan

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Wirnan, Waringarri Aboriginal Arts
By Jan Goongaja Griffiths, Artist, Waringarri Aboriginal Arts

As a group from Waringarri Aboriginal Arts in the East Kimberley, we are proud to present our Wirnan Project as part of the Desert River Sea: Portraits of the Kimberley exhibition.

“Wirnan” is a traditional Miriwoong word that describes the trade and exchange of gifts from one tribe to another. The trade of Wirnan is a way of keeping each of us connected through sharing and most importantly giving each other ideas and making artefacts. Collecting is connecting to our Country to know who we are and our children and how we used to communicate and talk and understand each other’s ways. To respect and understand our Country.

When we began this project, we had the privilege and permission to listen to one of our leaders (who has now passed) talking in Miriwoong language. She spoke about how the four Indigenous tribes came together to a special place, to trade their gifts at Argument Gap.

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Jan Goongaja Griffiths from Waringarri Aboriginal Arts

It took us a while to brainstorm and to draw what Wirnan meant to us. When our map of drawings was finished, we hung it up, sat back and looked at it. We saw that we had drawn similar pictures to express Wirnan of the old and the now. So, we decided to make four coolamons as it was the main artefact used for carrying all sorts of things. Two coolamons, made traditionally from wood and paperbark, to acknowledge our ancestors from the past that walked from different directions to trade their gifts such as spears, boomerangs, spearheads, dances, songs, corroboree, ochre and traditional marriages. And two more coolamons, made with steel and ceramic, to represent our present day with similar trades, but with gifts such as food, blankets, material and money. We laid out many rocks separated in four different colours to represent the tribal boundaries. One of our highlights was going out on Country to collect what we needed for our project, to make it bigger and better, more special and meaningful.

Our Wirnan project needed more to be done, so we added a projector to show video clips and photos old and new of our people and culture. We included artefacts that we’d made with wood and ceramic at our art centre and a fire to represent the traditional dance that took place to celebrate the coming together of the tribes.

Making the Wirnan project was a big challenge for our group, but in the end, we did it. There was heartache and emotions for the dedication of two of our leaders who had recently passed away and our inspiring group who had poured our hearts and soul into this project. We can now stand proud and say that we have accomplished our Wirnan project as one strong cultural group, reminding us of how our tribal groups came together as one big family those many, many years ago.

Thank you to everyone that has made the journey, travelling near, far and wide to the Art Gallery of WA on Noongar Country as one, to share our legacies, to exchange our stories and art in different mediums. Our Wirnan project is all about this, sharing, giving and exchanging.

Desert River Sea: Portraits of the Kimberley is showing at AGWA until 27 May 2019.

Next Collective Ambassadors making a difference in Western Australian arts

Next Collective Launch, Art Gallery of WEstern Australia, 11th September 2018.
Next Collective Ambassador, Annabel Keogh. Photography by Mac1 Photography.

 

AGWA launched the Next Collective last year – a new group for young professionals who want to make a difference in the arts and have a say in the direction of the beloved State Art Collection. Propelling the group forward are four ambassadors, selected for their contribution and passion for Western Australia arts.

We sat down recently with Next Collective Ambassador Annabel Keogh, a corporate affairs professional, to talk about how she together with other Next Collective Ambassadors; artists, Tarryn Gill and Ian Strange and lawyer, Dr Andrew Lu OAM – is embracing her new role in encouraging more young people to take an interest in the arts and why this is important for the growth of the Western Australian creative community.

Annabel, you’ve been involved with AGWA for a while now. How did you become involved as an Ambassador for Next Collective?

I’ve been involved with the Gallery for a couple of years originally through the Friends of AGWA which was one of the main reasons I was asked to come on board, to look at how to encourage more young people to engage with the Gallery. When the Friends of AGWA dissolved, that’s when I got involved with the Gallery’s Next Collective program.

So, what makes Next Collective differ from any other AGWA membership and/or unique for that matter to any other arts philanthropy program out there?

Next Collective takes your interest in the Gallery to the next level. There’s a gap in the market with people who want to give back and feel connected to institutes like the Gallery but they’re unsure of how to. The average person looks at it and thinks, ‘That’s out of my league’.  The Next Collective is an opportunity to get involved. It’s also different because it’s not a passive membership, which differs from the average philanthropy program. You can be active through this program, have a say in and see where your donations go. I think it’s a more satisfying experience than your average membership opportunities.

As a Next Collective member, what opportunities will you experience?

The opportunities being explored are about connection – meeting new people, not only within the gallery but also throughout the community, and others who love art. I think it’s also the opportunity to peek behind the curtain of what happens at the Gallery. See how it works, which is what most people are interested in. It’s something you often don’t get the chance to do as a member of the general public.

 

Next Collective Launch, Art Gallery of WEstern Australia, 11th September 2018.
Next Collective Launch at the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Photography by Mac1 Photography

This is an unexplored territory for AGWA. How do you see the Gallery benefiting from this new group?

I think the Gallery will be able to connect with a new generation of people who are interested in supporting institutions, and get a broader sense of ‘what is important’ for the community. It’s a great opportunity for the Gallery to reach out and ask what attracts people and what Perth is interested in and tailor their programs for a new group of people that are not the average taste. You get the chance to tap into a different vibe, and a different demographic, and I think that gives AGWA the opportunity to expand and be more innovative and grow in different directions.

Thinking of joining the Next Collective and championing the arts here in Western Australia? Contact our Foundation Office on 9492 6761 or foundation@artgallery.wa.gov.au, or visit our website artgallery.wa.gov.au for more information.

The Next Collective is supported by the Minderoo Foundation.